Comparison of the long-term outcome for patients with rheumatoid arthritis with persistent moderate disease activity or disease remission during the first year after diagnosis: data from the ESPOIR cohort. - Université de Bretagne Occidentale Access content directly
Journal Articles Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases Year : 2014

Comparison of the long-term outcome for patients with rheumatoid arthritis with persistent moderate disease activity or disease remission during the first year after diagnosis: data from the ESPOIR cohort.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate if patients with early RA with persistent moderate disease activity during the first year after diagnosis have a worse 3-5 year outcome than those who achieve sustained clinical remission within the first year, in a daily life setting. METHODS: The ESPOIR cohort included patients with early arthritis of <6 months' duration. Treatment was the standard of care. We had 5-year follow-up data for 573 patients. This study compared patients who had persistent moderate disease activity (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28)>3.2 and ≤5.1) at both the 6- and 12-month visits, with those who were in sustained DAS28 remission. The primary outcome was radiographic progression at the 36-month visit. Secondary endpoints were clinical remission (DAS28 score, Simplified Disease Activity Index, ACR/EULAR criteria), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and number of missed workdays at months 36 and 60. A Fisher exact test was used to compare categorical variables, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for quantitative variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine predictors of outcome. RESULTS: Patients were aged 48.1±12.5 years and their duration of symptoms was 103.2±52.1 days. Mean baseline DAS28 was 5.1±1.3. Persistent moderate disease activity (107 patients) rather than sustained remission (155 patients) during the first year was associated with increased radiographic disease progression at 3 years (OR=1.99 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.79)), increased HAQ-DI at 3 and 5 years (5.23 (2.81 to 9.73) and 4.10 (2.16 to 7.80), respectively), a 7-11 times smaller chance of achieving clinical remission and a five times greater number of missed workdays. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with early RA with persistent moderate disease activity during the first year had a worse outcome than patients who achieved sustained clinical remission. Persistent moderate disease activity affects long-term structure, remission rate and functional and work disability. Such patients may benefit from intensive treatment.
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Dates and versions

hal-01044967 , version 1 (24-07-2014)

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Bernard Combe, Isabelle Logeart, M. C. Belkacemi, S. Dadoun, Thierry Schaeverbeke, et al.. Comparison of the long-term outcome for patients with rheumatoid arthritis with persistent moderate disease activity or disease remission during the first year after diagnosis: data from the ESPOIR cohort.. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2014, epub ahead of print. ⟨10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204178⟩. ⟨hal-01044967⟩
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